Śūnyatā (Sanskrit: शून्यता, romanized: śūnyatā; Pali: suññatā; English: /ʃnˈjɑː.tɑː/ shoon-YAH-tah), translated most often as emptiness,[1] vacuity, and sometimes voidness,[2] is an Indian philosophical concept. Within Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism and other philosophical strands, the concept has multiple meanings depending on its doctrinal context. It is either an ontological feature of reality, a meditative state, or a phenomenological analysis of experience.

Quick facts: Translations of Śūnyatā, English, Sanskrit, P...
Translations of
Śūnyatā
Englishemptiness, voidness, vacuity, openness, thusness
SanskritŚūnyatā
(Dev: शून्यता)
PaliSuññatā
(Dev: सुञ्ञता)
Bengaliশূন্যতা
(Shunnôta)
Burmesethone nya ta, သုညတ
Chinese
(Pinyin: Kōng)
Japanese
(Rōmaji: )
Khmerសុញ្ញតា
(UNGEGN: Sŏnhnhôta)
Korean공성(空性)
(RR: gong-seong)
Mongolianхоосон
Tibetanསྟོང་པ་ཉིད་
(Wylie: stong-pa nyid
THL: tongpa nyi
)
Thaiสุญตา
VietnameseKhông ̣(空)
Glossary of Buddhism
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In Theravāda Buddhism, Suññatā often refers to the non-self (Pāli: anattā, Sanskrit: anātman)[note 1] nature of the five aggregates of experience and the six sense spheres. Suññatā is also often used to refer to a meditative state or experience.

In Mahāyāna Buddhism, śūnyatā refers to the tenet that "all things are empty of intrinsic existence and nature (svabhava)",[4][5] but may also refer to the Buddha-nature teachings and primordial or empty awareness, as in Dzogchen, Shentong, or Chan.

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