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4-inch/50-caliber gun

Naval gun / From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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The 4″/50 caliber gun (spoken "four-inch-fifty-caliber") was the standard low-angle, quick-firing gun for United States, first appearing on the monitor Arkansas and then used on "Flush Deck" destroyers through World War I and the 1920s. It was also the standard deck gun on S-class submarines, and was used to rearm numerous submarines built with 3-inch (76 mm) guns early in World War II. United States naval gun terminology indicates the gun fired a projectile 4 inches (10 centimeters) in diameter, and the barrel was 50 caliber. 4x50 meant that the barrel was 200 inches long, or 16 feet long .[2][3]

Quick facts: 4″/50 caliber gun Marks 7, 8, 9, and 10 , Ty...
4″/50 caliber gun Marks 7, 8, 9, and 10
USS_Ward_4_inch_gun_Minnesota_Capitol.jpg
The gun from USS Ward which fired the first American shot of World War II at Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941 at the State Capitol grounds in St. Paul, Minnesota.
TypeNaval gun
Place of originUnited States
Service history
In service1898–1945
Used by
Wars
Production history
DesignerBureau of Ordnance
Designed
  • Mark 7: 1898
  • Mark 8: 1905
  • Mark 9: 1914
  • Mark 10: 1914 (Did not enter service)
Manufacturer
No. built
  • Mark 7: 89
  • Mark 8: 12
  • Mark 9: 2,988
  • Mark 10: 1
VariantsMark 7, 8, 9 and 10
Specifications
Mass
  • Mark 7: 5,808 lb (2,634 kg) (with breech)
  • Mark 8: 6,440 lb (2,920 kg) (with breech)
  • Mark 9: 5,900 lb (2,700 kg) (with breech)
  • Mark 10: 6,860 lb (3,110 kg) (with breech)
Length
  • Mark 7: 204.5 in (5,190 mm)
  • Mark 8 and 9: 206.53 in (5,246 mm)
  • Mark 10: 211 in (5,400 mm)
Barrel lengthAll: 200 in (5,080 mm) bore (50 calibres)

Shell
  • Fixed ammunition
  • 33 lb (15 kg) (projectile)[1]
  • 62.4–64.75 lb (28.30–29.37 kg) (complete round)
Calibre4 in (102 mm)
Elevation-15° to +20°
Traverse-150° to 150°
Rate of fire8-9 rounds per minute
Muzzle velocity
  • Mark 7: 2,500 ft/s (760 m/s)[1]
  • Mark 8: 2,800 ft/s (850 m/s)
  • Mark 9 and 10: 2,900 ft/s (880 m/s)
Effective firing rangeMark 7: 9,000 yd (8,200 m) at 13° elevation
Maximum firing rangeMark 9: 15,920 yd (14,560 m) at 20° elevation[1]
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