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Berlin Palace

Former residence of the Prussian Kings, seat of the Humboldt Forum / From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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The Berlin Palace (German: Berliner Schloss), formally the Royal Palace (German: Königliches Schloss),[1] on the Museum Island in the Mitte area of Berlin, was the main residence of the House of Hohenzollern from 1443 to 1918. Expanded by order of King Frederick I of Prussia according to plans by Andreas Schlüter from 1689 to 1713, it was thereafter considered a major work of Prussian Baroque architecture.[2] The former royal palace was one of Berlin’s largest buildings and shaped the cityscape with its 60-meter-high (200 ft) dome.

Quick facts: Berlin Palace Berliner Schloss, General infor...
Berlin Palace
Berliner Schloss
The reconstruction of the Berlin Palace in September 2022, which houses the Humboldt Forum museum
Location within Berlin
Berlin Palace (Germany)
General information
StatusRebuilt
Architectural styleBaroque
LocationBerlin (Mitte), Germany
Construction started1443 (original)
2013 (reconstruction)
Completed1894 (original)
2020 (reconstruction)
DestroyedDamaged by Allied bombing in 1945, demolished by East German authorities in 1950
ClientElectors of Brandenburg
Kings of Prussia
German Emperors
Design and construction
Architect(s)Andreas Schlüter (original)
Franco Stella (reconstruction)
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Used for various government functions after the fall of the monarchy in 1918, it was damaged during the Allied bombing in World War II, and was demolished by the East German authorities in 1950. In the 1970s, it became the location of the modernist East German Palace of the Republic (the central government building of East Germany). After German reunification and several years of debate and discussion, particularly regarding the fraught historical legacy of both buildings, the Palace of the Republic was itself demolished in 2009 and the Berlin Palace was reconstructed beginning in 2013 to house the Humboldt Forum museum. The reconstruction was completed in 2020.