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Carrickaport lough

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Carrickaport Lough
Carrickaport Lough location in Ireland
Location in Ireland
LocationCounty Leitrim
Coordinates54°1′48″N 7°58′58″W / 54.03000°N 7.98278°W / 54.03000; -7.98278Coordinates: 54°1′48″N 7°58′58″W / 54.03000°N 7.98278°W / 54.03000; -7.98278
Lake typeFreshwater
Native nameCarraig an Phoirt Loch  (Irish)
Basin countriesIreland
Surface area0.46 km2 (0.18 sq mi)
Max. depth7 m (23 ft)
Surface elevation63 m (207 ft)
Islands1
References[1][2][3]

Carrickaport lough (Irish: Carraig an Phoirt, meaning "rocks of the bog [port, a bog here]")[4][5] is a freshwater lake in Kiltubrid parish, south County Leitrim, northwest Ireland. Drumcong village, and Lough Scur, lie nearby. Carrickaport lough is known for quality bream and pike fishing.[6] The ecology of Carrickaport lough, and other Leitrim waterways, is threatened by curly waterweed, zebra mussel, and freshwater clam invasive species.[7]

Etymology

The lake takes its name from the bordering townland of "Carrickaport" (Irish: Carraig an Phoirt), meaning the "rock of the port (or fort, or bank)".[4]

Geography

Carrickaport lough is located due west of the Drumcong village and Lough Scur, in county Leitrim, Ireland. The lake has an hourglass shape with a surface-area of about 0.46 square kilometres (0.2 sq mi),[1][2] and depths of 7 metres (23.0 ft).[3] The level of Carrickaport lough is about 1 foot (0.3 m) higher than Lough Scur, and a small stream of 500 metres (1,640.4 ft) length running through Drumcong connects both lakes.[2] Carrickaport lough is surrounded by high lands and bounded by the townlands of Drumbullog, Corderry (Morton), Carrickaport, Mullaghycullen, Drumcong, and Roscarban. The substrate consists of rock (15%), cobble (70%), gravel (10%) and sand (5%).[8]

Ecology

Fish present in Carrickaport include "Roach-Bream hybrids", Perch, Bream of 3-4lbs, Roach, and Pike.[9] The pike population is the "native Irish strain" (Irish: liús meaning 'Irish Pike') not the other European Pike strain (Irish: gailliasc meaning 'strange or foreign fish').[7] The lake has stocks of Pike up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg).[3] The water quality was reported to be satisfactory c. 2001 – c. 2003 with a mesotrophic rating.[10][n 1]

Pollution

Following a survey in 2007 the condition of Carrickaport Lough was reported as "unsatisfactory" with Filamentous algae present,[8] and pollution, along with a serious zebra mussel infestation, being also reported.[12][7] Carrickaport Lough is reed-fringed,[3] with approximately one fifth of substrate vegetation being common club-rush, while Potamogeton pondweed and the alien species Elodea canadensis are also present.[8]

Crayfish extinction

Carrickaport lough, with a shallow rocky shore, has some ideal potential White-clawed crayfish habitat,[8] While a population of White-clawed crayfish has previously been reported, no specimens were found when last surveyed in 2007.[12] Indeed, crayfish are never been found with zebra mussel,[13] and Irish stocks are threatened by non-indigenous crayfish species importation.[14]

Rare moss

In August 2000 the "Weissia rostellata" moss, regarded as a rare species in Ireland,[15] was found growing unshaded to partly-shaded (by grasses and rushes) on the damp clay-mud of a sparsely vegetated ditch beside the lake.[16]

Other wildlife

The Lister's river snail (Viviparus fasciatus) is abundant, and hog louse is also present.[8]

Human settlement

The primary human settlement at Carrickaport is the village of Drumcong.

See also

References and notes

Notes

  1. ^ Trophic states of "Oligotrophic" and "Mesotrophic" are desirable, but freshwater lakes rated 'Eutrophic' or 'Hypertrophic' indicates pollution.[11]

Citations

Primary references

  • anglingireland. "Satellite Pike Waters in the Ballinamore and Keshcarrigan area". Inland Fisheries Ireland. Retrieved 5 August 2015.
  • "Carraig an Phoirt". pp. Archival records.

Secondary references

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Carrickaport lough
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