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Caviar

Food consisting of salt-cured roe / From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Caviar (also known as caviare; from Persian: خاویار, romanized: khâvyâr, lit.'egg-bearing') is a food consisting of salt-cured roe of the family Acipenseridae. Caviar is considered a delicacy and is eaten as a garnish or a spread.[1] Traditionally, the term caviar refers only to roe from wild sturgeon in the Caspian Sea and Black Sea[2] (Beluga, Ossetra and Sevruga caviars). The term caviar can also describe the roe of other species of sturgeon or other fish such as salmon, steelhead, trout, lumpfish, whitefish,[3] or carp.[4][5][6]

Salmon roe (left) and sturgeon caviar (right) served with mother of pearl caviar spoons to avoid tainting the taste of the caviar.
The rarest and most expensive form of caviar comes from the critically endangered beluga sturgeon that swims in the Caspian Sea

The roe can be "fresh" (non-pasteurized) or pasteurized, with pasteurization reducing its culinary and economic value.[7]