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DeepMind

Artificial intelligence company owned by Google / From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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DeepMind Technologies is a British artificial intelligence subsidiary of Alphabet Inc. and research laboratory founded in 2010. DeepMind was acquired by Google[4] in 2014 and became a wholly owned subsidiary of Alphabet Inc., after Google's restructuring in 2015. The company is based in London, with research centres in Canada,[5] France,[6] and the United States.

Quick facts: Type, Industry, Founded, Founders, Headquarte...
DeepMind Technologies Limited
TypeSubsidiary
IndustryArtificial intelligence
Founded23 September 2010; 12 years ago (2010-09-23)[1]
Founders
HeadquartersLondon, UK[2]
Key people
ProductsAlphaGo, AlphaStar, AlphaFold, AlphaZero
Number of employees
1,000+ (2022)[3]
Parent
Websitedeepmind.com
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DeepMind has created a neural network that learns how to play video games in a fashion similar to that of humans,[7] as well as a Neural Turing machine,[8] or a neural network that may be able to access an external memory like a conventional Turing machine, resulting in a computer that mimics the short-term memory of the human brain.[9][10]

DeepMind made headlines in 2016 after its AlphaGo program beat a human professional Go player Lee Sedol, a world champion, in a five-game match, which was the subject of a documentary film.[11] A more general program, AlphaZero, beat the most powerful programs playing go, chess and shogi (Japanese chess) after a few days of play against itself using reinforcement learning.[12] In 2020, DeepMind made significant advances in the problem of protein folding with AlphaFold.[13] In July 2022, it was announced that over 200 million predicted protein structures, representing virtually all known proteins, would be released on the AlphaFold database.[14][15]

DeepMind posted a blog post on 28 April 2022 on a single visual language model (VLM) named Flamingo that can accurately describe a picture of something with just a few training images.[16][17] In July 2022, DeepMind announced the development of DeepNash, a model-free multi-agent reinforcement learning system capable of playing the board game Stratego at the level of a human expert.[18]