Guru Purnima

Hindu festival honouring the Guru / From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Guru Purnima (Poornima) is a tradition dedicated to all the spiritual and academic Gurus, who are evolved or enlightened humans, ready to share their wisdom, based on Karma Yoga.[4] It is celebrated as a festival in India, Nepal and Bhutan by Hindus, Jains and Buddhists. This festival is traditionally observed to honour one's chosen spiritual teachers or leaders. It is observed on the Full Moon day (Purnima) in the Hindu month of Ashadha (June–July) as it is known in the Hindu Calendar. [5][6] The festival was revived by Mahatma Gandhi to pay tribute to his spiritual guru, Shrimad Rajchandra.[7] It is also known as Vyasa Purnima, for it marks the birthday of Veda Vyasa, the sage who authored the Mahabharata and compiled the Vedas.[8]

Quick facts: Guru Purnima, Official name, Observed by...
Guru Purnima
Kacha seeks blessing from Shukracharya
Official nameGuru Purnima (Guru Worship on a Summer Full Moon day)
Observed byJain, Hindu devotees & Buddhist disciples in Bhutan, India and Nepal
TypeNational, religious, cultural
SignificanceTo express gratitude towards spiritual teachers[1]
CelebrationsWorship of Guru and temple visit[2]
ObservancesGuru Pooja
Date māsa (amānta) / māsa (purnimānta), pakṣa, tithi
2022 date13 July (Wednesday)[3]
Frequencyannual
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Explanatory note
Hindu festival dates

The Hindu calendar is lunisolar but most festival dates are specified using the lunar portion of the calendar. A lunar day is uniquely identified by three calendar elements: māsa (lunar month), pakṣa (lunar fortnight) and tithi (lunar day).

Furthermore, when specifying the masa, one of two traditions are applicable, viz. amānta / pūrṇimānta. Iff a festival falls in the waning phase of the moon, these two traditions identify the same lunar day as falling in two different (but successive) masa.

A lunar year is shorter than a solar year by about eleven days. As a result, most Hindu festivals occur on different days in successive years on the Gregorian calendar.
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