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Kiltyclogher

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Kiltyclogher

Coillte Clochair
Village
Kiltyclogher
Kiltyclogher
Location in Ireland
Coordinates: 54°21′23″N 8°02′16″W / 54.35643°N 8.037811°W / 54.35643; -8.037811Coordinates: 54°21′23″N 8°02′16″W / 54.35643°N 8.037811°W / 54.35643; -8.037811
CountryIreland
ProvinceConnacht
CountyCounty Leitrim
Elevation
76 m (249 ft)
Population
 (2011)
 • Total233
Time zoneUTC+0 (WET)
 • Summer (DST)UTC-1 (IST (WEST))
Irish Grid ReferenceG976455

Kiltyclogher (Irish: Coillte Clochair, meaning "stoney bucket") is a small village in County Leitrim, Ireland. It is on the border with Fermanagh, close to the hamlet of Cashelnadrea.

Population

Kiltyclogher's population at the 2011 census was 233 residents, a decline of 21 from the 2006 figure of 254.[1] Back in 1925, Kiltyclogher village comprised 38 houses, 7 being licensed to sell alcohol.[2]

Locations of interest

Prince Connell's Grave

Corracloona Court Tomb, also called "Prince Connell's Grave", is located outside Kiltyclogher, on the Glenfarne road. It is a passage grave and dates from the 2nd millennium B.C.[3]

Seán Mac Diarmada's house

Seán Mac Diarmada's house
Seán Mac Diarmada's house

The family home of Seán Mac Diarmada, one of the seven signatories of the 1916 Proclamation of Irish independence, who was executed by the British in May 1916,[4] is a three-roomed thatched cottage with some thatched outbuildings, partially surrounded by rhododendrons, and overlooking Upper Lough Macnean.[5]

Black Pig's Dyke

Remnants of the Black Pig's Dyke (Irish: Gleann na muice duibhe, meaning "glen of the black pig"), exist to the west of the village. These prehistoric earthworks, between the old rival Irish provinces of Ulster and Connacht, may have been constructed as defences against invasion and/or cattle-raiding.[6][7]

Transport

Bus Éireann route 470 serves the village on Fridays and Saturdays providing links to Manorhamilton, Sligo, Rossinver and Glenfarne.[8]

References

Primary references

  1. ^ Census 2011 - Preliminary results: Actual and percentage change in population 2006 to 2011 by Province County City Urban area Rural area and Electoral division by District, Year and Statistic Archived 2013-10-29 at the Wayback Machine Central Statistics Office, Dublin, 2011. Retrieved: 2012-02-01.
  2. ^ Irish Free State 1925, pp. 31.
  3. ^ http://www.geograph.ie/photo/1119120
  4. ^ The seven signatories - Seán MacDiarmada at http://unitedirelander.blogspot.ie. Accessed 24 June 2015
  5. ^ "Places to Visit >> Sean Mac Diarmada's Homestead". Leitrim Tourism. Leitrim Tourism. Retrieved 16 February 2015.
  6. ^ Black Pig's Dyke Joint research project prospectus, March 2014, p 7. Accessed 24 June 2015
  7. ^ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LsKoVFx0Gdw
  8. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2012-10-25. Retrieved 2013-05-04. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)

Secondary references

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Kiltyclogher
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