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Léman (department)

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Department of Léman

Département du Léman
1798–1813
Léman and other annexed departments
StatusDepartment of the French First Republic and the French First Empire
Chef-lieuGeneva
46°12′N 6°09′E / 46.2°N 6.15°E / 46.2; 6.15
Official languagesFrench
Historical eraFrench Revolutionary Wars
• Annexation of the Republic of Geneva
13 December 1798
• Genevian restoration
31 December 1813
Area
18042,800[1] km2 (1,100 sq mi)
Population
• 1804
215,884[2]
• 1812
210,478[1]
Preceded by
Succeeded by
Republic of Geneva
Restoration and Regeneration in Switzerland
Today part of

Léman (French: [lemɑ̃]) was a department of the French First Republic and French First Empire. Its name came from the French name of Lake Geneva, Lac Léman. It was formed in 1798, when the Republic of Geneva was annexed by the French Republic. Léman also included districts that were previously part of the departments of Mont-Blanc (northern Savoy) and Ain (around Gex). Its territory corresponded with the present Swiss canton of Geneva and parts of the present French departments of Ain and Haute-Savoie.

The Chef-lieu of the department was Genève. The department was subdivided into the following three arrondissements and cantons:[1]

After the final defeat of Napoleon in 1815, the former Republic of Geneva became a Swiss canton, and Savoy was returned to the Kingdom of Sardinia. The area around Gex returned to the department of Ain.

Administration

Prefects

The Prefect was the highest state representative in the department.

Term start Term end Office holder
2 March 1800[3] 10 December 1802 Ange Marie d'Eymar
10 December 1802[4] 30 November 1810 Claude Ignace Brugière de Barante
30 November 1810[5] 5 January 1814 Guillaume Antoine Benoît Capelle
5 January 1814[6] Not installed Louis Toussaint de La Moussaye

Secretary-General

The Secretary-General was the deputy to the Prefect.

Term start Term end Office holder
2 March 1800 ?? ?? 1802 Cornuaud
?? ?? 1803 ?? ?? 1811 Étienne Charles Garnier
?? ?? 1811 31 December 1813 J.J. Councler

Subprefects of Bonneville

Term start Term end Office holder
1 August 1800[7] 12 June 1811 Joseph Marie Gavard
12 June 1811[7] 31 December 1813 Gavard Fils
26 December 1811[7] 31 December 1813 Jean Baptiste Rogniat

Subprefects of Genève

The office of Subprefect of Genève was held by the Prefect until 1811.

Term start Term end Office holder
14 January 1811[7] 7 May 1812 Bouthillier de Beaumont
7 May 1812[7] 31 December 1813 Jean Baptiste Bourgeois de Jessaint

Subprefects of Thonon

Term start Term end Office holder
5 April 1800[7] 1 October 1804 François Plagnat
1 October 1804[7] 31 December 1813 Joseph Jérôme Milliet

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c Almanach Impérial. Imprimerie de Sa Majesté. 1812. p. 418.
  2. ^ Prudhomme, Louis Marie (1804). Dictionnaire universel, géographique, statistique, historique et politique de la France. Baudouin. p. 147.
  3. ^ Archives Nationales. "EYMAR, Ange Marie d'". francearchives.fr. Retrieved 22 June 2019.
  4. ^ Archives Nationales. "BRUGIÈRE DE BARANTE, Claude Ignace". francearchives.fr. Retrieved 22 June 2019.
  5. ^ Archives Nationales. "CAPELLE, Guillaume Antoine Benoît". francearchives.fr. Retrieved 22 June 2019.
  6. ^ Archives Nationales. "DE LA MOUSSAYE, Louis Toussaint". francearchives.fr. Retrieved 22 June 2019.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g Tulard, Jean & Marie-José (2014). Napoléon et 40 millions de sujets: La centralisation et le premier empire. p. 212.
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Léman (department)
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