Sicilian Americans (Sicilian: Sìculu-miricani; Italian: Siculoamericani) are Americans of Italian Sicilian birth or ancestry. They are a large ethnic group in the United States.[2]

Quick facts: Siculo-americani (Italian) Sìculu-mirica...
Sicilian Americans
Siculo-americani (Italian)
Sìculu-miricani (Sicilian)
Total population
85,175
(2000 American Community Survey)[1]
Regions with significant populations
New York City, New Haven, Buffalo, Rochester, Cleveland, Erie, Tampa, Pittsburgh, Chicago, Boston, Pittston, Easton, Pennsylvania, Johnston, Rhode Island, Detroit, Philadelphia, Los Angeles, San Francisco, New Orleans, Milwaukee
Languages
American English  Italian  Sicilian
Religion
predominantly Roman Catholic
Related ethnic groups
Italian Americans  Italian Canadians  Italian Australians  Maltese Americans  Italians (Sicilians)
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The first Sicilians who came to the territory that is now the United States were explorers and missionaries in the 17th century under the Spanish crown. Sicilian emigration to the United States then increased significantly in the starting from before 1880 to 1906, Direct connections by sea departed from the ports of Palermo and Castellammare del Golfo.

Since emigration from Sicily began in the United States before the unity of Italy, and reached its peak at a time when regional differences were still very strong and marked, both linguistically and ethnically, many of the Sicilian immigrants identified (and still identify) primarily on a regional rather than a national basis. Today, there are many studies also dedicated to the history of Sicilian Americans.

The Sicilian-American community includes people born in Sicily who immigrated to the United States, or born in the United States to Sicilian parents, as well as their third, fourth, etc. generation descendants, who identify as belonging to such community.

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