Statement (logic)

Declarative sentence that is true or false, or an assertion made by the sentence / From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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In logic, the term statement is variously understood to mean either:

  1. a meaningful declarative sentence that is true or false, or
  2. a proposition. Which is the assertion that is made by (i.e., the meaning of) a true or false declarative sentence.

In the latter case, a statement is distinct from a sentence in that a sentence is only one formulation of a statement, whereas there may be many other formulations expressing the same statement.

By a statement, I mean "that which one states", not one’s stating of it. There are many interpretations of what the term statement means, but generally, it indicates either a meaningful declarative sentence that is either true or false ("bivalence"). As you might expect, a proposition is an assertion that is made by (i.e., the meaning of) a true or false declarative sentence. A proposition is what a statement means, it is the notion or idea that a statement expresses, i.e., what it represents. It could be said that "2 + 2 = 4" and "two plus two equals four" are two different statements that are expressing the same proposition in two different ways.[1]