HuffPost

American online news aggregator and blog / From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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HuffPost (The Huffington Post until 2017; often abbreviated as HuffPo) is an American progressive[1][2][3][4] news website, with localized and international editions. The site offers news, satire, blogs, and original content, and covers politics, business, entertainment, environment, technology, popular media, lifestyle, culture, comedy, healthy living, women's interests, and local news featuring columnists.[5] It was created to provide a progressive alternative to the conservative news websites such as the Drudge Report.[6][7][8][9] The site offers content posted directly on the site as well as user-generated content via video blogging, audio, and photo.[10] In 2012, the website became the first commercially run United States digital media enterprise to win a Pulitzer Prize.[11]

Quick facts: Type of site, Available in, Founded, Hea...
HuffPost
Type of site
News aggregator, blog
Available in
  • English
  • French
  • Greek
  • Italian
  • Japanese
  • Korean
  • Portuguese
  • Spanish
FoundedMay 9, 2005 (2005-05-09)
Headquarters770 Broadway
New York City, U.S.
Area servedAnglosphere, Francosphere, Hispanosphere, Lusosphere, Greece, Italy, Japan, South Korea
OwnerBuzzFeed
Created by
ParentBuzzFeed
URLhuffpost.com
CommercialYes
RegistrationOptional
LaunchedMay 9, 2005; 17 years ago (2005-05-09)
Current statusActive
Close

Founded by Andrew Breitbart, Arianna Huffington, Kenneth Lerer, and Jonah Peretti,[7][12] the site was launched on May 9, 2005 as a counterpart to the Drudge Report.[13] In March 2011, it was acquired by AOL for US$315 million, making Arianna Huffington editor-in-chief.[14][15] In June 2015, Verizon Communications acquired AOL for US$4.4 billion and the site became a part of Verizon Media.[16] In November 2020, BuzzFeed acquired the company.[17] Weeks after the acquisition, BuzzFeed laid off 47 HuffPost staff in the U.S. (mostly journalists)[18] and closed down HuffPost Canada, laying off 23 staff working for the Canadian and Quebec divisions of the company.[19]