The Roaring Silence

1976 studio album by Manfred Mann's Earth Band / From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Roaring Silence is the seventh studio album by English rock band Manfred Mann's Earth Band. It was released on 27 August 1976, by Bronze Records in the UK and by Warner Bros. Records in the US. Like other Earth Band albums, this includes material by other composers. "Blinded by the Light", which reached number one on the Billboard Hot 100,[3] is a cover version of a song by Bruce Springsteen;[3] "Questions" is based on the main theme of Franz Schubert's Impromptu in G flat Major (1827);[4] "Starbird" takes its theme from Igor Stravinsky's ballet The Firebird (1910); and "The Road to Babylon" is based on the canon "By the Waters of Babylon" by Philip Hayes. This album marked the arrival of vocalist/guitarist Chris Hamlet Thompson, and Dave Flett who replaced longtime guitarist/vocalist/composer Mick Rogers. It is also the last album recorded with founding member Colin Pattenden.

Quick facts: The Roaring Silence, Studio album by Manfred ...
The Roaring Silence
Studio album by
Released27 August 1976
Recorded1976
StudioWorkhouse Studios London
Genre
Length39:55
Label
ProducerManfred Mann's Earth Band
Manfred Mann's Earth Band chronology
Nightingales and Bombers
(1975)
The Roaring Silence
(1976)
Watch
(1978)
Singles from The Roaring Silence
  1. "Blinded by the Light"
    Released: 6 August 1976
  2. "Questions"
    Released: 1976
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Table info: Review scores, Source, Rating...
Professional ratings
Review scores
SourceRating
AllMusic [1]
Christgau's Record GuideC [2]
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"Waiter, There's a Yawn in My Ear" is based on a live recording (with studio overdubs added later). Its main riff is taken from the Manfred Mann Chapter Three track "Fish" which was recorded for their abandoned third album. It was ultimately released in 2005 on the Odds & Sods – Mis-takes & Out-takes box set.

Nightingales & Bombers was released, and when Chris [Thompson] and I joined we'd done an American tour without recording. I remember, on tour, we did a few tracks from the Nightingales & Bombers album, including 'Spirit in the Night.' We also did 'Father of Day, Father of Night,' and a couple of the newer ones, what would wind up on The Roaring Silence, to see how they went down.

Dave Flett, Prog Rock FAQ: All That's Left to Know About Rock's Most Progressive Music

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