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Academia Nacional de Medicina dos Estados Unidos

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A Academia Nacional de Medicina dos Estados Unidos (em inglês: National Academy of Medicine), conhecida como Institute of Medicine (IOM) até 30 de junho de 2015,[1] é uma organização não governamental sem fins lucrativos dos Estados Unidos, fundada em 1970 com base na carta congressional da Academia Nacional de Ciências dos Estados Unidos.[2] É parte das Academias Nacionais de Ciências, Engenharia e Medicina, que também inclui:

Membros notáveis

  • Harold Amos, microbiologist and professor
  • Nancy Andrews, Dean of Duke University School of Medicine
  • Elizabeth Blackburn, biologist
  • Ben Carson, columnist and retired American neurosurgeon, former director of pediatric neurosurgery at Johns Hopkins Hospital
  • Dennis S. Charney, dean of the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City
  • Jewel Plummer Cobb, cell biologist and President of California State University, Fullerton, 1981–90
  • Francis Collins, geneticist, leader in the Human Genome Project and NIH Director
  • James Collins, synthetic biology pioneer and MacArthur genius
  • Anthony Cerami, pioneering medical researcher
  • Kenneth L. Davis, author, medical researcher and CEO of Mount Sinai Medical Center
  • Stanton Glantz, Professor of Medicine (UCSF) and prominent tobacco control researcher and activist
  • Margaret Hamburg, commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration
  • Maurice Hilleman, microbiologist
  • David Ho, pioneer in the use of protease inhibitors in treating HIV-infected patients
  • Leroy Hood, winner of the 2003 Lemelson-MIT Prize
  • Arthur Kellermann, professor and founding chairman of the department of Emergency Medicine at Emory University
  • Herbert Kleber, professor of psychiatry, Yale University.
  • Philip John Landrigan, pediatrician and leading advocate of children's health
  • Jeffrey Lieberman, chair of psychiatry, Columbia University; president, American Psychiatric Association
  • Rudolph Leibel, MD, professor at Columbia University whose co-discovery at Rockefeller University of the hormone leptin, and cloning of the leptin and leptin receptor genes, has had a major role in the area of understanding human obesity.[3][4]
  • Susan Lindquist, a molecular biologist and former Director of the Whitehead Institute
  • Howard Markel, George E. Wantz Distinguished Professor of the History of Medicine and Director of the Center for the History of Medicine at the University of Michigan
  • Maclyn McCarty, youngest member of the research team responsible for the Avery-MacLeod-McCarty experiment
  • Sheri McCoy, CEO of Avon Products and former Vice Chairman of Johnson & Johnson
  • Ruslan Medzhitov, professor of immunobiology at Yale University, co-discoverer of human Toll Like Receptors (TLRs) and winner of the inaugural Else Kröner-Fresenius-Foundation award in 2013
  • Mario Molina, recipient of the 1995 Nobel Prize in Chemistry
  • Herbert Needleman, pediatrician and psychiatrist
  • Carl F. Nathan, Professor of Immunology and Microbial Pathogenesis at Weill Cornell Medical College. Winner of the inaugural Anthony Cerami Award in Translational Medicine
  • Peter Richard Orszag, 37th Director of the Office of Management and Budget under President Barack Obama
  • Nicholas A. Peppas, pioneer of biomaterials and drug delivery
  • Samir M. Chebaro, Stanford Medical Center, Dean’s office Child Care Task Force
  • Patricia Flatley Brennan, professor of Nursing and Industrial Engineering at University of Wisconsin–Madison, and theme leader at the Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery.
  • Frederick Redlich, dean of the Yale School of Medicine from 1967 to 1972
  • James Rothman, winner of the 2002 Albert Lasker Award for Basic Medical Research
  • Jeffrey Sachs, economist and director of the Earth Institute at Columbia University
  • David A. Savitz, director of the Disease Prevention and Public Health Institute at the Mount Sinai Medical Center
  • Shirley Marie Tilghman, former president of Princeton University
  • Mary Wakefield, appointed administrator of the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) by President Barack Obama in February 2009
  • Douglas Cecil Wallace, geneticist and pioneer of human mitochondrial genetics
  • Sheldon Weinbaum, biomedical engineer, biofluid mechanician and Distinguished Professor, Emeritus, at The City College of New York
  • Kern Wildenthal, former president of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School
  • William Julius Wilson, sociologist
  • Elias Zerhouni, former executive vice-dean of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and director of the National Institutes of Health under George W. Bush
  • Shimon Glick, Ben Gurion University, endocrinology, internal medicine, medical education and medical ethics.

Referências

  1. «Institute of Medicine to Become National Academy of Medicine» (em inglês). Consultado em 7 de outubro de 2015. Arquivado do original em 28 de abril de 2015 
  2. «About the IOM» (em inglês). Consultado em 13 de janeiro de 2013. Arquivado do iom.edu original Verifique valor |url= (ajuda) em 9 de agosto de 2013 
  3. Shell E (1 de janeiro de 2002). «Chapter 4: On the Cutting Edge». The Hungry Gene: The Inside Story of the Obesity Industry. [S.l.]: Atlantic Monthly Press. ISBN 978-1422352434 
  4. Shell E (1 de janeiro de 2002). «Chapter 5: Hunger». The Hungry Gene: The Inside Story of the Obesity Industry. [S.l.]: Atlantic Monthly Press. ISBN 978-1422352434 
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Academia Nacional de Medicina dos Estados Unidos
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