Allegheny Uprising

1939 film by William A. Seiter / From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Allegheny Uprising (released in the UK as The First Rebel) is a 1939 American Adventure Western film directed by William A. Seiter and starring Claire Trevor and John Wayne. Based on the 1937 novel The First Rebel by Neil H. Swanson, with a screenplay by the film's producer, P. J. Wolfson, the film is loosely based on the historical event known as the Black Boys Rebellion, which took place in 1765 after the conclusion of the French and Indian War. It was produced by RKO Pictures.

Quick facts: Allegheny Uprising, Directed by, Screenplay b...
Allegheny Uprising
AlleghenyUprisingposter.jpg
one-sheet poster for the film
Directed byWilliam A. Seiter
Screenplay byP. J. Wolfson
Based onThe First Rebel
by Neil H. Swanson
Produced byP. J. Wolfson
StarringClaire Trevor
John Wayne
CinematographyNicholas Musuraca
Edited byGeorge Crone
Music byAnthony Collins
Production
company
Distributed byRKO Radio Pictures
Release date
  • November 10, 1939 (1939-11-10)
Running time
81 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Budget$696,000[1]
Box office$750,000[1]
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Clad in buckskin and a coonskin cap (as he would be a decade later in The Fighting Kentuckian), Wayne plays real-life James Smith, an American coping with British rule in colonial America. The supporting cast includes Brian Donlevy, George Sanders and Chill Wills. Claire Trevor and John Wayne also headed the cast of John Ford's Stagecoach the same year, and in both films as well as Dark Command the following year, Trevor is top-billed over Wayne due to her greater name value at the time.

The film did not fare well in its initial release. The superficially similar John Ford film Drums Along the Mohawk had been released only one week prior. In the United Kingdom, where the film kept the original title, it was initially banned by the Ministry of Information for placing the British, already at war against Nazi Germany, in a bad light.[2]

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