Captain Haddock

Comic character by Belgian cartoonist Hergé / From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Captain Archibald Haddock (French: Capitaine Archibald Haddock, pronounced [kapitɛn aʁʃibald adɔk]) is a fictional character in The Adventures of Tintin, the comics series by Belgian cartoonist Hergé. He is one of Tintin's best friends, a seafaring pipe-smoking Merchant Marine Captain.

Quick facts: Captain Haddock, Publication information, Pub...
Captain Haddock
Captain Haddock (Capitaine Haddock) from The Seven Crystal Balls by Hergé
Publication information
PublisherCasterman (Belgium)
First appearanceThe Crab with the Golden Claws (1941)
The Adventures of Tintin
Created byHergé
In-story information
Full nameArchibald Haddock
PartnershipsList of main characters
Supporting character ofTintin
Close

Haddock is initially depicted as a weak and alcoholic character under the control of his treacherous first mate Allan, who keeps him drunk and runs his freighter. He regains his command and his dignity, even rising to president of the Society of Sober Sailors (The Shooting Star), but never gives up his love for rum and whisky, especially Loch Lomond, until the final Tintin adventure, Tintin and the Picaros, when Professor Calculus 'cures' him of his taste for alcohol. In the adventure Secret of the Unicorn (and continuing in Red Rackham's Treasure) he and Tintin travel to find a pirate's treasure captured by his ancestor, Sir Francis Haddock (François de Hadoque in French). With newfound wealth and regaining his ancestral home Marlinspike Hall, Captain Haddock becomes a socialite; riding a horse, wearing a monocle, and sitting in a theatre box seat (The Seven Crystal Balls). He then evolves to become genuinely heroic, volunteering to sacrifice his life to save Tintin's own in the pivotal Tintin in Tibet. In later volumes he is clearly retired.

Throughout it all, the Captain's coarse humanity and sarcasm act as a counterpoint to Tintin's often implausible heroism. He is always quick with a dry comment whenever the boy reporter gets too idealistic.