DomainKeys Identified Mail

Email authentication method designed to detect email spoofing / From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Dear Wikiwand AI, let's keep it short by simply answering these key questions:

Can you list the top facts and stats about DomainKeys Identified Mail?

Summarize this article for a 10 year old

SHOW ALL QUESTIONS

DomainKeys Identified Mail (DKIM) is an email authentication method designed to detect forged sender addresses in email (email spoofing), a technique often used in phishing and email spam.

DKIM allows the receiver to check that an email that claimed to have come from a specific domain was indeed authorized by the owner of that domain.[1] It achieves this by affixing a digital signature, linked to a domain name, to each outgoing email message. The recipient system can verify this by looking up the sender's public key published in the DNS. A valid signature also guarantees that some parts of the email (possibly including attachments) have not been modified since the signature was affixed.[2] Usually, DKIM signatures are not visible to end-users, and are affixed or verified by the infrastructure rather than the message's authors and recipients.

DKIM is an Internet Standard.[3] It is defined in RFC 6376, dated September 2011, with updates in RFC 8301 and RFC 8463.

Oops something went wrong: