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Erebidae

Family of moths / From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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The Erebidae are a family of moths in the superfamily Noctuoidea. The family is among the largest families of moths by species count and contains a wide variety of well-known macromoth groups. The family includes the underwings (Catocala); litter moths (Herminiinae); tiger, lichen, and wasp moths (Arctiinae); tussock moths (Lymantriinae), including the arctic woolly bear moth (Gynaephora groenlandica);[1] fruit-piercing moths (Calpinae and others); micronoctuoid moths (Micronoctuini); snout moths (Hypeninae); and zales, though many of these common names can also refer to moths outside the Erebidae (for example, crambid snout moths). Some of the erebid moths are called owlets.

Quick facts: Erebidae, Scientific classification ...
Erebidae
Black_witch_moth_%28Ascalapha_odorata%29.JPG
Black witch moth
Ascalapha odorata, Brazil
Scientific classification Edit this classification
Domain: Eukaryota
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Class: Insecta
Order: Lepidoptera
Superfamily: Noctuoidea
Family: Erebidae
(Leach, [1815])
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Erebid_moth_%28Eulepidotis_affinis%29.jpg
Eulepidotis affinis, Panama
Arge_Moth_3779.11.17.06w.wiki.jpg
Apantesis arge caterpillar (Arctiinae)
Halysidota_tessellaris_cocoon.jpg
Halysidota tessellaris, cocoon

The sizes of the adults range from among the largest of all moths (>5 in (127 mm) wingspan in the black witch) to the smallest of the macromoths (0.25 in (6 mm) wingspan in some of the Micronoctuini). The coloration of the adults spans the full range of dull, drab, and camouflaged (e.g., Zale lunifera and litter moths) to vivid, contrasting, and colorful (e.g., Aganainae and tiger moths). The moths are found on all continents except Antarctica.

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