Fineness

Weight of fine metal in a precious metal object / From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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The fineness of a precious metal object (coin, bar, jewelry, etc.) represents the weight of fine metal therein, in proportion to the total weight which includes alloying base metals and any impurities. Alloy metals are added to increase hardness and durability of coins and jewelry, alter colors, decrease the cost per weight, or avoid the cost of high-purity refinement. For example, copper is added to the precious metal silver to make a more durable alloy for use in coins, housewares and jewelry. Coin silver, which was used for making silver coins in the past, contains 90% silver and 10% copper, by mass. Sterling silver contains 92.5% silver and 7.5% of other metals, usually copper, by mass.

Various ways of expressing fineness have been used and two remain in common use: millesimal fineness expressed in units of parts per 1,000[1] and karats or carats used only for gold. Karats measure the parts per 24, so that 18 karat = 18ā„24 = 75% and 24 karat gold is considered 100% gold.[2]