Gold leaf

Very thin gold used in art / From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Gold leaf is gold that has been hammered into thin sheets (usually around 0.1 µm thick[1]) by a process known as goldbeating,[2] for use in gilding.

Small_gold_nugget_5mm_dia_and_corresponding_foil_surface_of_half_sq_meter.jpg
A gold nugget of 5 mm (0.2 in) in diameter (bottom) can be expanded through hammering into a gold foil of about 0.5 m² (5.4 sq ft). Toi gold mine museum, Japan

Gold leaf is a type of metal leaf, but the term is rarely used when referring to gold leaf. The term metal leaf is normally used for thin sheets of metal of any color that do not contain any real gold. Gold leaf is available in a wide variety of karats and shades. The most commonly used gold is 22-karat yellow gold. Pure gold is 24 karat. Real, yellow gold leaf is approximately 91.7% pure (i.e. 22-karat) gold.

Traditional water gilding is the most difficult and highly regarded form of gold leafing. It has remained virtually unchanged for hundreds of years and is still done by hand.

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