cover image

Greek and Coptic

Unicode character block / From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Dear Wikiwand AI, let's keep it short by simply answering these key questions:

Can you list the top facts and stats about Greek and Coptic?

Summarize this article for a 10 year old

SHOW ALL QUESTIONS

Greek and Coptic is the Unicode block for representing modern (monotonic) Greek. It was originally also used for writing Coptic,[1] using the similar Greek letters in addition to the uniquely Coptic additions. Beginning with version 4.1 of the Unicode Standard, a separate Coptic block has been included in Unicode, allowing for mixed Greek/Coptic text that is stylistically contrastive, as is convention in scholarly works. Writing polytonic Greek requires the use of combining characters or the precomposed vowel + tone characters in the Greek Extended character block.

Quick facts: Greek and Coptic, Range, Plane, Scripts, Majo...
Greek and Coptic
RangeU+0370..U+03FF
(144 code points)
PlaneBMP
ScriptsGreek (117 char.)
Coptic (14 char.)
Common (4 char.)
Major alphabetsGreek
Assigned135 code points
Unused9 reserved code points
Source standardsISO 8859-7
Unicode version history
1.0.0 (1991)112 (+112)
1.0.1 (1992)103 (-9)
1.1 (1993)105 (+2)
3.0 (1999)110 (+5)
3.1 (2001)112 (+2)
3.2 (2002)115 (+3)
4.0 (2003)120 (+5)
4.1 (2005)124 (+4)
5.0 (2006)127 (+3)
5.1 (2008)134 (+7)
7.0 (2014)135 (+1)
Unicode documentation
Code chart ∣ Web page
Note: [1][2][3]
Close
UCB_Greek_and_Coptic.png
Greek and Coptic Unicode Character Block (UCB)

Its block name in Unicode 1.0 was simply Greek, although Coptic letters were already included.[4]

Oops something went wrong: