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Lady Otsuya

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Lady Otsuya (おつやの方 Otsuya no Kata) was a Japanese woman from the Sengoku period. She was the aunt of the famous samurai Oda Nobunaga, the wife of Tōyama Kagetō and foster mother of Oda Katsunaga. She was the ruler of Iwamura Castle until the last days of her life.

Siege of Iwamura Castle

At the apex of the anti-Nobunaga coalition, in 1572, Takeda Shingen ordered Akiyama Nobutomo, one of the "Twenty-Four Generals" of Shingen, to attack the castle, but Otsuya and her husband were prepared to defend. After days of resistance, Tōyama Kagetō, the commander of the castle's garrison, fell ill and died. Lady Otsuya became the female lord of Iwamura castle and continued to defend the castle until March 6, 1573 when she made an agreement with the Takeda clan. Akiyama Nobutomo negotiated the castle's surrender with Lady Otsuya, and she settled in a peace treaty without bloodshed and ceased attacks. The adopted son of Otsuya and the official keeper of the castle, a seven-year-old lord called Gobōmaru (Oda Katsunaga) was taken to the Takeda home in the province of Kai as a hostage. In accordance with the surrender treaty, Lady Otsuya married Akiyama.[1]

Remains of Iwamura castle
Remains of Iwamura castle

Second siege

When Oda army defeated the army of Shingen's son, Takeda Katsuyori, in the Battle of Nagashino, Oda Nobutada and others surrounded Iwamura castle. In 1575, Oda Nobunaga decided to attack and take his aunt's castle, but she defended it against Oda's fierce assault for a half a year. After six months of battle, she left the castle to respond to Oda's false plea for peace. However Nobunaga reneged on his word and had Otsuya and Nobutomo crucified as traitors on December 23, 1575.[2]

See also

References

  1. ^ "asahi.com(朝日新聞社):岩村城 結婚受け入れた女城主 - 東海の古戦場をゆく - トラベル". www.asahi.com. Retrieved 2019-04-06.
  2. ^ "Iwamura Castle | A Collection of Photographs of Japanese Castles". castle.jpn.org. Retrieved 2019-04-06.


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Lady Otsuya
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