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Peñon woman

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Peñon woman or Peñon Woman III is the name for the human remains, specifically a skull, of a Paleo-Indian woman found by an ancient lake bed in Pueblo Peñón de los Baños in Mexico City in 1959.[1]

Peñon Woman III was found on an island in the middle of Lake Texcoco.[2]

The skeleton's age has been estimated by radiocarbon dating by Silvia Gonzalez of Liverpool John Moores University.[3] Her 14C date is 10,755±55 years[2] (12,705 cal years) BP.

She is one of the oldest human remain found in the Americas.[4][5][6]

Gonzalez theorizes that Peñon woman is related to the historic Pericú people of Baja California, who also shared similar physical traits.[7]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Connor, Steve (3 December 2002). "Does skull prove that the first Americans came from Europe?". The Independent. London. Retrieved 23 June 2011.
  2. ^ a b Grattan and Torrence 91
  3. ^ "The New World may be far older than it originally seemed." The Economist. 14 July 2005. Retrieved 15 April 2012.
  4. ^ Legon, Jeordan. "Scientist: Oldest American skull found." CNN 4 Dec 2002. Retrieved 15 April 2012.
  5. ^ Steve Connor (3 December 2002). "Does skull prove that the first Americans came from Europe?". The Independent.
  6. ^ "George Erikson: Who Were The Earliest Americans?". historynewsnetwork.org.
  7. ^ Rincon, Paul. "Tribe challenges American origins." BBC News. 7 Sept 2004. Retrieved 15 April 2012.

References

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Peñon woman
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