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California Environmental Protection Agency

Environmental agency in California / From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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The California Environmental Protection Agency, or CalEPA, is a state cabinet-level agency within the government of California. The mission of CalEPA is to restore, protect and enhance the environment, to ensure public health, environmental quality and economic vitality.[2]

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California Environmental Protection Agency
Logo of CalEPA
Agency overview
FormedJuly 17, 1991; 31 years ago (1991-07-17)
HeadquartersCal/EPA Building, Sacramento, California
Employees4,550 permanent staff
Annual budget$14.3 billion (2019-20)[1]
Agency executives
  • Yana Garcia, Secretary
  • Serena McIlwain, Undersecretary
Child agencies
Websitehttp://www.calepa.ca.gov/
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The current Secretary for Environmental Protection (Secretary of CalEPA) is Yana[3] Garcia,[4] (formerly Jared Blumenfeld), and is a member of Governor Gavin Newsom's cabinet.[5] The Office of the Secretary heads CalEPA and is responsible for overseeing and coordinating the activities of one office, two boards, and three departments dedicated to improving California's environment.[6]

The Secretary of CalEPA is also directly responsible for coordinating the administration of the Unified Program and certifying Unified Program Agencies. The CalEPA Unified Program coordinates, and makes consistent the administrative requirements, permits, inspections, and enforcement activities of six environmental and emergency response programs. The state agencies responsible for these programs set the standards for their program while local governments implement the standards. To date, there are 83 Certified Unified Program Agencies (CUPAs), who are accountable for carrying out responsibilities previously handled by approximately 1,300 different state and local agencies.[7]

CalEPA should not be confused with the similarly named federal United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).