Google Doodle

Temporary alteration of the logo on Google's homepages to commemorate holidays and events / From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A Google Doodle is a special, temporary alteration of the logo on Google's homepages intended to commemorate holidays, events, achievements, and notable historical figures. The first Google Doodle honored the 1998 edition of the long-running annual Burning Man event in Black Rock City, Nevada, and was designed by co-founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin to notify users of their absence in case the servers crashed.[1][2][3] Early Marketing employee Susan Wojcicki then spearheaded subsequent Doodles, including an alien landing on Google and additional custom logos for major holidays.[4] Google Doodles were designed by an outside contractor until 2001, when Page and Brin asked public relations officer Dennis Hwang to design a logo for Bastille Day. Since then, a team of employees called "Doodlers" have organized and published the Doodles.[5]

The first Google Doodle, on August 30, 1998, which celebrated Burning Man

Initially, Doodles were neither animated nor hyperlinked—they were simply images with hover text describing the subject or expressing a holiday greeting. Doodles increased in both frequency and complexity by the beginning of the 2010s. In January 2010 the first animated Doodle honored Sir Isaac Newton.[6] The first interactive Doodle appeared shortly thereafter celebrating Pac-Man,[7] and hyperlinks also began to be added to Doodles, usually linking to a search results page for the subject of the Doodle. By 2014, Google had published over 2,000 regional and international Doodles throughout its homepages,[8] often featuring guest artists, musicians, and personalities.[9] By 2019, the "Doodlers" team had created over 4,000 doodles for Google's homepages around the world.[10]