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Hart, South Australia

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Hart
South Australia
Hart
Hart
Coordinates33°45′24″S 138°26′19″E / 33.756530°S 138.438730°E / -33.756530; 138.438730Coordinates: 33°45′24″S 138°26′19″E / 33.756530°S 138.438730°E / -33.756530; 138.438730
Population45 (2016 census)[1]
Postcode(s)5464
Elevation182 m (597 ft)[2]
Location
LGA(s)Wakefield Regional Council
State electorate(s)Electoral district of Frome
Federal division(s)Division of Grey
Localities around Hart:
Brinkworth, Rochester Marola, Anama
Condowie Hart Bungaree
Blyth Benbournie

Hart is a locality in the Mid North region of South Australia. The boundaries were formalised in January 2000 for the long established name for the area.[3] There was a railway siding at Hart on the Gladstone railway line.[2] The major industry in the area is cereal crop growing.

Name

The Hundred of Hart (part of the cadastral system in South Australia) was proclaimed in 1864[4] and named after Captain John Hart, a member of the colony's parliament and the Treasurer at the time (and later Premier).[5]

Geography

The Hundred of Hart lies on the plains and western slope of the Yackamoorundie Range (known as the Middle Range at the time the Hundred was proclaimed). The eastern boundary of the Hundred is about 11+14 miles (18.1 km) along the crest of the range, mostly above 400 metres (1,300 ft) altitude, running roughly north–south. The southern boundary is part of the northern boundary of the Hundred of Blyth. The northern and western boundaries were arbitrary straight lines running true west and true south. The northern boundary is about 8+12 miles (13.7 km) long.[6] The western boundary is now mostly followed by a road, which includes the main street of Brinkworth and is below 200 metres (660 ft) altitude.[5] The current Bounded Locality of Hart occupies almost the southern half of the Hundred.[3]

There was a Government Town named Anama surveyed in 1865, which was not fully developed, and officially ceased to exist in 1924. It was named for a local property owned by George Charles Hawker, near what is now the boundary of Hart and Rochester, both in the Hundred of Hart.[7] The railway station may have been named for this Government Town on some maps, rather than for the Hundred district it was in.

School and church

Hart previously had a school which operated from 1895 to 1922.[8] One of the notable former pupils was Sir Lyell McEwin, who had been born in the area.[9] The residents of the district had been petitioning the government to provide a school,[10] however they eventually erected a stone building to serve as a community hall, for uses including a public school and religious worship.[11]

The Annie McEwin Snow Presbyterian Memorial Church opened in 1923.[12] It was named in honour of Alexander Lyell McEwin Snr's daughter who had died after a brief illness, aged only 30.[13] Construction was funded by him and her father-in-law. It stands adjacent to the Hart hall which had also been the school.[14] It closed in 1976 and is now a private residence.[15]

Hart Field Site

Hart Field Site is a 40-hectare (99-acre) agronomic field trial site where broadacre crops and cropping techniques are tested.[16] The site is owned by the Hart Field-Site Group, established as a committee in 1982. The group bought this permanent site in 2000 with the financial support of Wakefield Regional Council, the group having previously used privately owned land near the current site.[17]

References

  1. ^ Australian Bureau of Statistics (27 June 2017). "Hart (State Suburb)". 2016 Census QuickStats. Retrieved 14 June 2021. Edit this at Wikidata
  2. ^ a b "Placename Details: Hart Railway Station". Property Location Browser. Government of South Australia. 23 September 2008. SA0029500. Retrieved 8 December 2015.
  3. ^ a b "Placename Details: Hart". Property Location Browser. Government of South Australia. 23 September 2008. SA0029488. Retrieved 8 December 2015.
  4. ^ "COUNTY OF STANLEY". Adelaide Observer. SA: National Library of Australia. 26 November 1864. p. 4. Retrieved 9 December 2015.
  5. ^ a b "Placename Details: Hundred of Hart". Property Location Browser. Government of South Australia. 29 January 2009. SA0029510. Retrieved 8 December 2015.
  6. ^ "COUNTY OF STANLEY". Adelaide Observer. SA: National Library of Australia. 26 November 1864. p. 4. Retrieved 10 December 2015.
  7. ^ "Placename Details: Anama". Property Location Browser. Government of South Australia. 12 May 2011. SA0001271. Retrieved 9 December 2015.
  8. ^ "Placename Details: Hart School". Property Location Browser. Government of South Australia. 23 September 2008. SA0042971. Retrieved 8 December 2015.
  9. ^ Judith Raftery, 'McEwin, Sir Alexander Lyell (1897–1988)', Australian Dictionary of Biography, National Centre of Biography, Australian National University, http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/mcewin-sir-alexander-lyell-15104/text26305, published first in hardcopy 2012, accessed online 9 December 2015.
  10. ^ "DEPUTATIONS". The Express and Telegraph. Adelaide, SA: National Library of Australia. 5 September 1895. p. 2 Edition: SECOND EDITION. Retrieved 9 December 2015.
  11. ^ "Mews Letters". Northern Argus. Clare, SA: National Library of Australia. 6 December 1895. p. 2. Retrieved 9 December 2015.
  12. ^ "NEW CHURCH AT HART". The Advertiser. Adelaide, SA: National Library of Australia. 19 October 1923. p. 9. Retrieved 9 December 2015.
  13. ^ "Family Notices". Northern Argus. Clare, SA: National Library of Australia. 9 September 1921. p. 5. Retrieved 9 December 2015.
  14. ^ "Opening of Memorial Church at Hart". Northern Argus. Clare, SA: National Library of Australia. 2 November 1923. p. 5. Retrieved 9 December 2015.
  15. ^ "Hart near Brinkworth. Interior of the Annie McEwin Snow Memorial Presbyterian Church. Opened in 1923. Closed 1976. Funded by Sir Lyell McEwin as a memorial to one of his daughters". 22 October 2015.
  16. ^ "Hart Field Site Group". Hart Field Site. Retrieved 9 December 2015.
  17. ^ "Hart - Over 25 Years of Excellence". Hart Field Site. Retrieved 9 December 2015.
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Hart, South Australia
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