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Oi u luzi chervona kalyna

Ukrainian patriotic march song / From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Oh, the Red Viburnum in the Meadow (Ukrainian: Ой у лузі червона калина, romanized: Oi u luzi chervona kalyna) is a Ukrainian patriotic march first published in 1875 by Volodymyr Antonovych and Mykhailo Drahomanov.[1][2][3] It was written in a modern treatment by the composer Stepan Charnetsky in 1914, in honor and memory of the Sich Riflemen of the First World War. The song has many variations.

Quick facts: "Oi u luzi chervona kalyna", Song, Language, ...
"Oi u luzi chervona kalyna"
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Image of a 1922 print of the song
Song
LanguageUkrainian
English titleOh, the Red Viburnum in the Meadow
Released1914
Genrepatriotic
Songwriter(s)Stepan Charnetsky
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The song performed by the military band of the Air Force of the Armed Forces of Ukraine and 3 choirs in Vinnytsia

The song "Oi u luzi" was in the repertoire of Feodor Chaliapin.[4]

The red viburnum (kalyna in Ukrainian)—a deciduous shrub that grows four to five metres tall—is referenced throughout Ukrainian folklore.[5] A silhouette of it is depicted along the edges of the flag of the president of Ukraine.

Following the 2014 annexation by Russia of the Ukrainian Crimean peninsula, and then the 2022 Russian invasion of Ukraine, singing "nationalist anthems" such as Chervona Kalyna in Crimea became punishable by fines and imprisonment.

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