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Palace of Versailles

French palace located in Île-de-France / From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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The Palace of Versailles (/vɛərˈs, vɜːrˈs/ vair-SY, vur-SY;[1] French: Château de Versailles [ʃɑto d(ə) vɛʁsɑj] (listen)) is a former royal residence built by King Louis XIV located in Versailles, about 12 miles (19 km) west of Paris, France. The palace is owned by the French Republic and since 1995 has been managed, under the direction of the French Ministry of Culture, by the Public Establishment of the Palace, Museum and National Estate of Versailles.[2] About 15,000,000 people visit the palace, park, or gardens of Versailles every year, making it one of the most popular tourist attractions in the world.[3]

Quick facts: Palace of Versailles, General information, Ar...
Palace of Versailles
Château de Versailles (French)
Garden façade and fountains; Hall of Mirrors
Interactive fullscreen map
General information
Architectural styleClassicalism and Baroque
LocationVersailles, France
Coordinates48°48′17.3″N 2°7′13.2″E
Construction started1661 (1661)
OwnerGovernment of France
Website
en.chateauversailles.fr
Official nameChateau and Park of Versailles
CriteriaCultural: i, ii, vi
Reference83
Inscription1979 (3rd Session)
Area1,070 ha
Buffer zone9,467 ha
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Louis XIII built a simple hunting lodge on the site of the Palace of Versailles in 1623 and replaced it with a small château in 1631–34. Louis XIV expanded the château into a palace in several phases from 1661 to 1715. It was a favorite residence for both kings, and in 1682, Louis XIV moved the seat of his court and government to Versailles, making the palace the de facto capital of France. This state of affairs was continued by Kings Louis XV and Louis XVI, who primarily made interior alterations to the palace, but in 1789 the royal family and capital of France returned to Paris. For the rest of the French Revolution, the Palace of Versailles was largely abandoned and emptied of its contents, and the population of the surrounding city plummeted.

Napoleon I, following his coronation, used Versailles as a summer residence from 1810 to 1814, but did not restore it. Following the Bourbon Restoration, when the king was returned to the throne, he resided in Paris and it was not until the 1830s that meaningful repairs were made to the palace. A museum of French history was installed within it, replacing the apartments of the southern wing.

The palace and park were designated a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1979 for its importance as the center of power, art, and science in France during the 17th and 18th centuries.[4] The French Ministry of Culture has placed the palace, its gardens, and some of its subsidiary structures on its list of culturally significant monuments.