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Songbird

Suborder of birds / From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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A songbird is a bird belonging to the suborder Passeri of the perching birds (Passeriformes). Another name that is sometimes seen as the scientific or vernacular name is Oscines, from Latin oscen, "songbird". The Passeriformes contains 5,000 or so species[1][2] found all over the world, in which the vocal organ typically is developed in such a way as to produce a diverse and elaborate bird song.

Quick facts: Songbird Temporal range Early Eocene to pres...
Songbird
Temporal range: Early Eocene to present 56–0 Ma
Eopsaltria_australis_-_Mogo_Campground.jpg
Eastern yellow robin (Eopsaltria australis)
Song of a chipping sparrow (Spizella passerina)
Scientific classification Edit this classification
Domain: Eukaryota
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Passeriformes
Clade: Eupasseres
Suborder: Passeri
Linnaeus, 1758
Clades

Menuridae
Atrichornithidae
Climacteridae
Ptilonorhynchidae
Maluridae
Meliphagidae
Dasyornithidae
Pardalotidae
Acanthizidae
Pomatostomidae
Orthonychidae
Cnemophilidae
Melanocharitidae
Callaeidae
Notiomystidae
Corvides
Passerida

Synonyms

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Songbirds form one of the two major lineages of extant perching birds (~4,000 species), the other being the Tyranni (~1,000 species), which are most diverse in the Neotropics and absent from many parts of the world.[2] The Tyranni have a simpler syrinx musculature, and while their vocalizations are often just as complex and striking as those of songbirds, they are altogether more mechanical sounding. There is a third perching bird lineage, the Acanthisitti from New Zealand, of which only two species remain alive today.[3] Recent estimates indicate that songbirds originated 50 million years ago.[4] The distribution of their basal lineages suggest that their origin and initial diversification occurred exclusively in the Australian continent and only about 40 million years ago, oscines started to colonize Eurasia, Africa, and eventually the Americas.[5][4][6]

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