Chinese nationality law

History and regulations of Chinese citizenship / From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Chinese nationality law details the conditions by which a person holds nationality of the People's Republic of China (PRC). The primary law governing these requirements is the Nationality Law of the People's Republic of China, which came into force on September 10, 1980.

Quick facts: Nationality Law of the People's Republic of C...
Nationality Law of the People's Republic of China
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National People's Congress
Territorial extentPeople's Republic of China (including Hong Kong and Macau)
Enacted by5th National People's Congress
EnactedSeptember 10, 1980
EffectiveSeptember 10, 1980
Related legislation
Nationality Act (Republic of China)
Status: In force
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Quick facts: Nationality Law of the People's Republic of C...
Nationality Law of the People's Republic of China
Traditional Chinese中華人民共和國國籍法
Simplified Chinese中华人民共和国国籍法
Portuguese name
PortugueseLei da Nacionalidade da República Popular da China[1]
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Foreign nationals may naturalize if they are permanent residents in any part of China or they have immediate family members who are Chinese citizens. Residents of the Taiwan Area are also considered Chinese citizens, due to the PRC's extant claim over areas controlled by the Republic of China (ROC).

Although mainland China, Hong Kong, and Macau are all administered by the PRC, Chinese citizens do not have automatic residence rights in all three jurisdictions; each territory maintains a separate immigration policy. Voting rights and freedom of movement are tied to the region in which a Chinese citizen is domiciled, determined by hukou in mainland China and right of abode in the two special administrative regions.

While Chinese law makes possessing multiple citizenships difficult, a large number of residents in Hong Kong and Macau have some form of British or Portuguese nationality due to the history of those regions as former European colonies. Chinese nationals who voluntarily acquire foreign citizenship automatically lose Chinese nationality.

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