cover image

New Hampshire

U.S. state / From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Dear Wikiwand AI, let's keep it short by simply answering these key questions:

Can you list the top facts and stats about New Hampshire?

Summarize this article for a 10 year old

SHOW ALL QUESTIONS

New Hampshire is a state in the New England region of the Northeastern United States. It borders Massachusetts to the south, Vermont to the west, Maine and the Gulf of Maine to the east, and the Canadian province of Quebec to the north. Of the 50 U.S. states, New Hampshire is the fifth smallest by area and the tenth least populous, with a population of 1,377,529 residents as of the 2020 census. Concord is the state capital and Manchester is the most populous city. New Hampshire's motto, "Live Free or Die", reflects its role in the American Revolutionary War; its nickname, "The Granite State", refers to its extensive granite formations and quarries.[10] It is well known nationwide for holding the first primary (after the Iowa caucus) in the U.S. presidential election cycle, and for its resulting influence on American electoral politics.[11]

Quick facts: New Hampshire, Country, Before statehood, Adm...
New Hampshire
State of New Hampshire
Nickname(s): 
Granite State
White Mountain State[1]
Motto: 
Anthem: "Old New Hampshire"[2]
Map of the United States with New Hampshire highlighted
Map of the United States with New Hampshire highlighted
CountryUnited States
Before statehoodProvince of New Hampshire
Admitted to the UnionJune 21, 1788 (9th)
CapitalConcord
Largest cityManchester
Largest county or equivalentHillsborough
Largest metro and urban areasGreater Boston (combined and metro)
Nashua (urban)
Government
  GovernorChris Sununu (R)
  Senate PresidentJeb Bradley (R)[note 1]
LegislatureGeneral Court
  Upper houseSenate
  Lower houseHouse of Representatives
JudiciaryNew Hampshire Supreme Court
U.S. senatorsJeanne Shaheen (D)
Maggie Hassan (D)
U.S. House delegation1: Chris Pappas (D)
2: Ann McLane Kuster (D) (list)
Area
  Total9,350[3] sq mi (24,216 km2)
  Land8,954 sq mi (23,190 km2)
  Water396 sq mi (1,026 km2)  4.2%
  Rank46th
Dimensions
  Length190 mi (305 km)
  Width68 mi (110 km)
Elevation
1,000 ft (300 m)
Highest elevation6,288 ft (1,916.66 m)
Lowest elevation
(Atlantic Ocean[5])
0 ft (0 m)
Population
 (2023)
  Total1,402,054
  Rank42nd
  Density150/sq mi (58/km2)
   Rank21st
  Median household income
$73,381[6]
  Income rank
8th
Demonym(s)Granite Stater
New Hampshirite
Language
  Official languageEnglish[7]
(French allowed for official business with Quebec; other languages allowed for certain specific uses)[8]
Time zoneUTC−05:00 (Eastern)
  Summer (DST)UTC−04:00 (EDT)
USPS abbreviation
NH
ISO 3166 codeUS-NH
Traditional abbreviationN.H.
Latitude42° 42′ N to 45° 18′ N
Longitude70° 36′ W to 72° 33′ W
Websitewww.nh.gov
Close
Quick facts: List of state symbols, Living insignia, Amphi...
State symbols of New Hampshire
List of state symbols
Flag_of_New_Hampshire.svg
Seal_of_New_Hampshire.svg
NH_state_emblem.jpg
Living insignia
AmphibianRed-spotted newt
Notophthalmus viridescens
BirdPurple finch
Haemorhous purpureus
ButterflyKarner Blue
Lycaeides melissa samuelis
Dog breedChinook
FishFreshwater: Brook trout
Salvelinus fontinalis
Saltwater: Striped bass
Morone saxatilis
FlowerPurple lilac
Syringa vulgaris
InsectLadybug
Coccinellidae
MammalWhite-tailed deer
Odocoileus virginianus
TreeWhite birch
Betula papyrifera
Inanimate insignia
FoodFruit: Pumpkin
Vegetable: White Potato
Berry: Blackberry[9]
GemstoneSmoky quartz
MineralBeryl
RockGranite
SportSkiing
TartanNew Hampshire state tartan
State route marker
Route marker
State quarter
New Hampshire quarter dollar coin
Released in 2000
Lists of United States state symbols
Close

New Hampshire was inhabited for thousands of years by Algonquian-speaking peoples such as the Abenaki. Europeans arrived in the early 17th century, with the English establishing some of the earliest non-indigenous settlements. The Province of New Hampshire was established in 1629, named after the English county of Hampshire.[12] Following mounting tensions between the British colonies and the crown during the 1760s, New Hampshire saw one of the earliest overt acts of rebellion, with the seizing of Fort William and Mary from the British in 1774. In January 1776, it became the first of the British North American colonies to establish an independent government and state constitution; six months later, it signed the United States Declaration of Independence and contributed troops, ships, and supplies in the war against Britain. In June 1788, it was the ninth state to ratify the U.S. Constitution, bringing that document into effect.

Through the mid-19th century, New Hampshire was an active center of abolitionism, and fielded close to 32,000 Union soldiers during the U.S. Civil War. After the war, the state saw rapid industrialization and population growth, becoming a center of textile manufacturing, shoemaking, and papermaking; the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company in Manchester was at one time the largest cotton textile plant in the world. The Merrimack and Connecticut rivers were lined with industrial mills, most of which employed workers from Canada and Europe; French Canadians formed the most significant influx of immigrants, and today roughly a quarter of all New Hampshire residents have French American ancestry, second only to Maine.

Reflecting a nationwide trend, New Hampshire's industrial sector declined after World War II. Since 1950, its economy diversified to include financial and professional services, real estate, education, transportation and high-tech, with manufacturing still higher than the national average.[13] Beginning in the 1950s, its population surged as major highways connected it to Greater Boston and led to more commuter towns. New Hampshire is among the wealthiest and most-educated states in the U.S.[14] It is one of nine states without an income tax and has no taxes on sales, capital gains, or inheritance while relying heavily on local property taxes to fund education; consequently, its state tax burden is among the lowest in the country. It ranks among the top ten states in metrics such as governance, healthcare, socioeconomic opportunity, and fiscal stability.[15][16] New Hampshire is one of the least religious states and known for its libertarian-leaning political culture; it was until recently a swing state in presidential elections.[17]

With its mountainous and heavily forested terrain, New Hampshire has a growing tourism sector centered on outdoor recreation. It has some of the highest ski mountains on the East Coast and is a major destination for winter sports; Mount Monadnock is among the most climbed mountains in the U.S. Other activities include observing the fall foliage, summer cottages along many lakes and the seacoast, motorsports at the New Hampshire Motor Speedway in Loudon, and Motorcycle Week, a popular motorcycle rally held in Weirs Beach in Laconia. The White Mountain National Forest includes most of the Appalachian Trail between Vermont and Maine, and has the Mount Washington Auto Road, where visitors may drive to the top of 6,288-foot (1,917 m) Mount Washington.

Oops something went wrong: