Pentium

Brand of microprocessors produced by Intel / From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Pentium is a series of x86 architecture-compatible microprocessors produced by Intel. The original Pentium was first released on March 22, 1993.

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Pentium
General information
LaunchedMarch 22, 1993; 29 years ago (1993-03-22)
Discontinued2023 (laptops only)[1]
Common manufacturer(s)
Performance
Max. CPU clock rate50 MHz to 4.4 GHz
FSB speeds50 MHz to 800 MT/s
DMI speeds2 GT/s to 16 GT/s
Architecture and classification
Technology node0.8 μm to Intel 7
Microarchitecture
Instruction setIA-32, x86-64
Instructionsx86
Physical specifications
Cores
  • 1-4
Socket(s)
Products, models, variants
Brand name(s)
Variant(s)
History
Predecessori486
SuccessorCore
Close
Pentium logos
1993–2003
2003–2006
2006–2009
2009–2013
2013-2015
2015–2020
2020–2022

Pentium-branded processors released from 2009 to 2022 are considered entry-level products that Intel rates as "two stars",[2][3] meaning that they are above the low-end Atom and Celeron series, but below the faster Intel Core lineup and workstation/server Xeon series. These later Pentium processors have little more than their name in common with earlier Pentiums, which were Intel's flagship processor for over a decade until the introduction of the Intel Core line in 2006. They are based on both the architecture used in Atom and that of Core processors. In the case of Atom architectures, Pentiums are the highest performance implementations of the architecture. Pentium processors with Core architectures prior to 2017 were distinguished from the faster, higher-end i-series processors by lower clock rates and disabling some features, such as hyper-threading, virtualization and sometimes L3 cache.

The name "Pentium" is originally derived from the Greek word pente (πεντε), meaning "five", a reference to the prior numeric naming convention of Intel's 80x86 processors (8086–80486), with the Latin ending -ium since the processor would otherwise have been named 80586 using that convention.

In 2017, Intel split Pentium into two line-ups:

  • Pentium Silver, aiming for low-power devices and shares architecture with Atom and Celeron.
  • Pentium Gold, aiming for entry-level desktop and using existing architecture, such as Kaby Lake or Coffee Lake.

In September 2022, Intel announced that the Pentium and Celeron brands will be replaced with the new "Intel Processor" branding for low-end processors in laptops from 2023 onwards.[1]