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Union (American Civil War)

Federal government of Lincoln's "North" U.S / From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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During the American Civil War, the United States (U.S.) was referred to as the Union, also known colloquially as the North, after eleven Southern slave states seceded to form the Confederate States of America (CSA), which was called the Confederacy, also known as the South. The name the "Union" arose from the declared goal of the United States, led by President Abraham Lincoln, of preserving the United States as a constitutional union.

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    • United States of America
    • Union
1861–1865
Anthem: Hail, Columbia (de facto)

My Country, 'Tis of Thee (de facto)
Map of the division of the states in the American Civil War (1861–1865). .mw-parser-output .legend{page-break-inside:avoid;break-inside:avoid-column}.mw-parser-output .legend-color{display:inline-block;min-width:1.25em;height:1.25em;line-height:1.25;margin:1px 0;text-align:center;border:1px solid black;background-color:transparent;color:black}.mw-parser-output .legend-text{}  Northern free states loyal to the United States .mw-parser-output .legend{page-break-inside:avoid;break-inside:avoid-column}.mw-parser-output .legend-color{display:inline-block;min-width:1.25em;height:1.25em;line-height:1.25;margin:1px 0;text-align:center;border:1px solid black;background-color:transparent;color:black}.mw-parser-output .legend-text{}  Southern slave states which seceded and formed the Confederacy.mw-parser-output .legend{page-break-inside:avoid;break-inside:avoid-column}.mw-parser-output .legend-color{display:inline-block;min-width:1.25em;height:1.25em;line-height:1.25;margin:1px 0;text-align:center;border:1px solid black;background-color:transparent;color:black}.mw-parser-output .legend-text{}  Southern slave states which remained in the Union (border states), though Missouri and Kentucky both had dual competing Confederate and Unionist governments, and West Virginia.mw-parser-output .legend{page-break-inside:avoid;break-inside:avoid-column}.mw-parser-output .legend-color{display:inline-block;min-width:1.25em;height:1.25em;line-height:1.25;margin:1px 0;text-align:center;border:1px solid black;background-color:transparent;color:black}.mw-parser-output .legend-text{}  U.S. territories, with the exception of the Indian Territory (later Oklahoma)
Map of the division of the states in the American Civil War (1861–1865).
  Northern and Western free states loyal to the United States
  Southern slave states which seceded and formed the Confederacy
  Southern slave states which remained in the Union (border states) though Missouri and Kentucky both had dual competing Confederate and Unionist governments, and West Virginia
  U.S. territories, with the exception of the Indian Territory (later Oklahoma)
StatusRump state
CapitalWashington, D.C.
GovernmentFederal presidential constitutional republic
President 
Abraham Lincoln
 1865
Andrew Johnson
Speaker of the House 
 1861–1863
Galusha A. Grow
 1863–1865
Schuyler Colfax
Chief Justice 
 1861–1864
Roger B. Taney
 1864–1865
Salmon P. Chase
Historical eraAmerican Civil War
 Southern states declared secession
1860–1861
March 4, 1861
April 12–13, 1861
January 1, 1863
1864
July 13–16, 1863
March 29, 1865
April 14, 1865
April 9 – November 6, 1865
Today part ofUnited States
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"Union" is used in the Preamble to the United States Constitution, which opens, "We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union ... do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America". In the context of the Civil War, "Union" is also often used as a synonym for "the northern states loyal to the United States government";[1] in this meaning, the Union included 20 free states and four southern border slave states, Delaware, Maryland, Kentucky, and Missouri, though Missouri and Kentucky both had dual competing Confederate and Unionist governments with the Confederate government of Kentucky and the Confederate government of Missouri.[2]

The Union Army was a new formation comprising mostly state units, together with units from the regular U.S. Army. Keeping the southern border states in the Union was essential to its winning the war, and Lincoln reportedly said, "I hope to have God on my side, but I must have Kentucky".[3][4]

The Northeast and Midwest provided the industrial resources for a mechanized war producing large quantities of munitions and supplies and financing the war. The Northeast and Midwest provided soldiers, food, horses, financial support, and training camps. Army hospitals were set up across the Union. Most Northern states had Republican governors who energetically supported the war effort and suppressed anti-war subversion, particularly that that arose in 1863–64.[5] The Democratic Party strongly supported the war at the beginning in 1861, but by 1862, was split between the War Democrats and the anti-war element known as Peace Democrats, led by the extremist "Copperheads".[6] The Democrats made major electoral gains in 1862 in state elections, most notably in New York. They lost ground in 1863, especially in Ohio. In 1864, the Republicans campaigned under the National Union Party banner, which attracted many War Democrats and soldiers[7] and scored a landslide victory for Lincoln and his entire ticket against Democratic candidate George B. McClellan.

The war years were quite prosperous except where serious fighting and guerrilla warfare ravaged the countryside. Prosperity was stimulated by heavy government spending and the creation of an entirely new national banking system. The Union states invested a great deal of money and effort in organizing psychological and social support for soldiers' wives, widows, and orphans, and for the soldiers themselves. Most soldiers were volunteers, although after 1862 many volunteered in order to escape the draft and to take advantage of generous cash bounties on offer from states and localities. Draft resistance was notable in some larger cities, especially in parts of New York City, with its massive anti-draft riots of July 1863 and in some remote districts such as the Coal Region of Northeastern Pennsylvania.

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